Portals and Rails

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Portals and Rails, a blog sponsored by the Retail Payments Risk Forum of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, is intended to foster dialogue on emerging risks in retail payment systems and enhance collaborative efforts to improve risk detection and mitigation. We encourage your active participation in Portals and Rails and look forward to collaborating with you.

November 17, 2014


Consumer Prepaid Protections May Be Catching Up with Prepaid Use

On November 13, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued its much-anticipated notice of proposed rulemaking of consumer protections for the prepaid market. This proposed rule covers multiple facets related to the prepaid industry, including disclosure requirements, fraud protection, access to account information, and the provisioning of credit via overdraft. Today's blog will provide a brief, high-level summary of this rule.

What is and isn't covered under this rule?
This rule redefines a "prepaid account" under Regulation E (Reg E). Prepaid products include cards, codes, and other devices capable of being loaded with funds that are not currently covered by Reg E and are usable at multiple, unaffiliated merchants and ATMs, and for person-to-person transfers. Gift cards, and certain related cards, are excluded.

Disclosure requirements
The rule requires that card issuers use two forms to disclose fees. The short form discloses four types of fees: monthly account fees, cash reload fees, ATM transaction fees, and purchase transaction fees. The rule proposes the use of a model form that establishes a safe harbor for compliance to the short-form requirement. The long form describes all of the potential account fees and the conditions under which these fees are assessed, as well as the fees that short form includes. Both disclosures must be made available to the consumer before the opening of an account.

Fraud protection
The rule modifies Reg E to require that issuers adopt error resolution procedures and limited liability for prepaid accounts. Reg E coverage limits a prepaid consumer's liability for unauthorized transfers to $50, assuming that the consumer gives timely notice to the financial institution and the card has been registered. Further, financial institutions would be required to resolve certain errors to prepaid consumer accounts.

Access to account information
The rule also modifies Reg E to require that financial institutions provide prepaid account holders with free access to periodic statements or that they make available to the consumer the account balance and at least 18 months of account transaction history. These periodic statements and transaction histories must include a summary of monthly and annual fees in addition to a listing of all deposits and debits.

Overdraft protection
The rule allows for issuers of prepaid accounts to offer overdraft services and other credit features. However, issuers that offer these services or features for a fee are subject to Regulation Z (Reg Z) credit card rules and disclosure requirements which, among other things, requires them to evaluate whether consumers can repay their debt. The issuer is required to obtain a consumer's consent before adding these services to accounts and must provide consumers with a periodic statement of the credit and provide at least 21 days to repay the debt. Should a product offer overdraft or other credit features, it must be disclosed in the disclosures of the short and long forms.

The CFPB is seeking public comment for a 90-day period, beginning with its publication in the Federal Register.

By Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


November 17, 2014 in consumer protection, prepaid, regulations | Permalink

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August 25, 2014


Forty Years and Still Scamming

I suspect that a lot of us have received a letter or an e-mail supposedly from another country's government official or banker informing us that there were some unexpected riches coming our way. We could become millionaires, these strangers tell us, by claiming a prize from a lottery that we don't remember entering. Or they say we just might become millionaires by helping them transfer money out of their country, since they can't because of some sort of bureaucracy or regulation. Before tossing these letters or e-mails into the trash, did you ever linger for just a moment wondering if these riches could actually be coming to you?

A large number of people, particularly in the United States, think the scam is legitimate and are willing to invest up to tens of thousands of dollars to claim their share of the pot of gold. Sadly, they find not only that there is no gold, but also that there isn't even a pot. This type of fraud is classified as an advance fee fraud because the scam involves the victim having to send money in advance, to cover fees or taxes, before they can receive their share of the bounty. The advance fee fraud is one type of 419 Nigerian fraud, so called because early versions originated in Nigeria, where criminal code 419 describes the fraud. 419 fraud began in the 1970s with letters—often with counterfeit postage marks—that targeted small business owners, requesting their help in handling new oil wealth.

Over the next three decades, the solicitations grew at such a tremendous pace that in 2002, the Department of Justice got a court order to allow postal employees to open every letter from Nigeria that was handled through the United States Postal Service's mail facility at John F. Kennedy Airport. They found that more than 70 percent of these letters contained some sort of fraudulent scheme solicitation.

As law enforcement's focus on Nigeria intensified, the 419 groups moved to other countries. These groups reportedly have major operations in at least 150 countries and the involvement of more than 800,000 people. Ultrascan Advanced Global Investigations (UAGI), an Amsterdam-based association focused on disrupting the operations of criminal networks, stated in a preliminary 2013 report that U.S. victims lost $2.3 billion in 2013—more than in any other country.

As with other types of criminal activity, the techniques that advance fee criminals use have become more sophisticated, evolving alongside technological advances. They've moved their method of solicitation from mail to faxes and then to e-mails. And now, instead of just sending mass mailings or e-mails, many of the criminals are tailoring e-mail messages, lacing them with personalized information obtained from social networks and professional and dating websites. For lottery-themed advance fee schemes, the UAGI estimates that 3 percent of the targets respond and make at least one advance payment.

Even more interesting, the report refutes some common misconceptions about the victims usually being lower income or with less education and desperate for some sort of financial windfall. In fact, a number of high-income professionals are taken in by some of the more sophisticated schemes involving high-dollar ventures including real estate development and medical equipment. The report also notes that, for victims losing more than $200,000, 85 percent of them had recently experienced some sort of life-changing family trauma such as a death, divorce, or major illness.

Education by financial institutions remains the most valuable tool to defend against these schemes. These institutions should use in-house media and other methods, such as public service announcements, to alert consumers to these scams, particularly those that appear in the FIs' service areas. I know of some institutions that train their frontline staff to watch for such unusual transactions, particularly by the elderly, as a supplement to their anti-money-laundering education. Financial institutions and consumers should report advance fee fraud attempts immediately to the local Secret Service or FBI office for investigation.

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

August 25, 2014 in consumer fraud, consumer protection | Permalink

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August 04, 2014


Fishing for Your Private Data

fishing Recently, I received a text from my daughter about an e-mail that appeared to be from her financial institution. The e-mail stated that online access to her bank account would be terminated because she had tried to access her account from several computers. However, she could retain access by clicking on a link. While my daughter's natural reaction was concern that she would lose online access to her bank account, I told her that this was probably a phishing incident.

Unlike the hobby of fishing, phishing is the work of fraudsters. With phishing, fraudsters attempt to dupe a consumer or employee into believing that they must immediately provide personal or private data in response to an e-mail that appears to be (but is not actually) from a legitimate entity. Much like fishing, phishing relies on numerous casts, with the phisher hoping that many of those who receive the e-mail will be fooled and swallow the bait. If they get hooked, malware may be loaded on their computer to monitor their keystrokes and pull out financial service website log-on credentials. Or, in my daughter's case, if she had clicked on the link, it would have most likely taken her to a legitimate-looking web page of the bank and requested her online banking credentials. The volume and velocity by which anyone can send e-mails has created a wide window of opportunity for fraudsters.

In their e-mail, the fraudsters create a sense of urgency by indicating some sort of drastic action will be taken unless the customer acts immediately. Although organizations have repeatedly posted statements that they would never send an e-mail asking for private data, this threatened action often causes the recipient to act without considering the consequences or taking the time to call the company or organization to verify the e-mail's authenticity. If it is not authentic, the individual should immediately delete the e-mail without replying, without clicking on any links embedded in the email, and without opening any attachments.

In addition to the need for consumers and employees to be wary of e-mails that are not legitimate, financial institutions must continually stay abreast of the latest technologies to help combat these schemes and educate customers. In a past post, we discussed steps financial institutions should take to help customers protect themselves from fraudsters. These schemes remain in the news even though banks, businesses, and government entities continue to post educational information and best practices for consumers and employees. As my daughter's example demonstrates, consumers opening bank accounts for the first time are not likely to know these schemes. This example suggests that—in addition to educating both business and consumer customers generally—it would be beneficial for financial institutions to place more emphasis on education concerning these schemes at the time customers open their accounts.

Photo of Deborah Shaw

August 4, 2014 in banks and banking, consumer fraud, consumer protection, data security, fraud, identity theft | Permalink

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June 30, 2014


A Call to Action on Data Breaches?

I recently moved, so I had to go online to change my address with retailers, banks, and everyone else with whom I do business. It also seemed like an ideal opportunity to follow up on the recommendations that came out after the Heartbleed bug and diligently change all my passwords. Like many people, I had a habit of using similar passwords that I could recall relatively easily. Now, I am creating complex and different passwords for each site that would be more difficult for a fraudster to crack (and at the same time more difficult for me to remember) in an attack against my devices.

I have found myself worrying about a breach of my personal information more frequently since news of the Heartbleed bug. Before, if I heard about a breach of a certain retailer, I felt secure if I did not frequent that store or have their card. Occasionally, I would receive notification that my data "may" have been breached, and the threat seemed amorphous. But the frequency and breadth of data breaches are increasing, further evidenced by the recent breach of a major online retailer's customer records. This breach affects about 145 million people.

As a consumer, I find the balance between protecting my own data and my personal bandwidth daunting to maintain. I need to monitor any place that has my personal data, change passwords and security questions, and be constantly aware of the latest threat. Because I work in payments risk, this awareness comes more naturally for me than for most people. But what about consumers who have little time to focus on cybersecurity and need to rely on being notified and told specifically what to do when there's been a breach of their data? And are the action steps usually being suggested comprehensive enough to provide the maximum protection to the affected consumers?

Almost all states have data breach notification laws, and with recent breaches, a number of them are considering strengthening those laws. Congress has held hearings, federal bills have been proposed, and there has been much debate about whether there should be a consistent national data breach notification standard, but no direct action to create such a standard has taken place. Is it time now to do so, or does there need to be more major breaches before the momentum to create such a standard makes it happen?

Photo of Deborah Shaw

June 30, 2014 in consumer protection, cybercrime, data security, privacy | Permalink

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June 23, 2014


Do Consumers REALLY Care about Payments Privacy and Security?

Consumer research studies have consistently shown that a top obstacle to adopting new payment technologies such as mobile payments is consumers' concern over the privacy and security protections of the technology. Could it be that consumers are indeed concerned but believe that the responsibility for ensuring their privacy and security falls to others? A May 2014 research study by idRADAR revealed the conundrum that risk managers often face: they know that consumers are concerned with security, but they also know they are not active in protecting themselves by adopting strong practices to safeguard their online privacy and security.

The survey asked respondents if they had taken any actions after hearing of the Target breach to protect their privacy or to prevent credit/debit card fraudulent activity. A surprising 79 percent admitted they had done nothing. Despite the scope of the Target data breach, only 4 percent of the respondents indicated that they had signed up for the credit and identity monitoring service that retailers who had been affected offered at no charge (see the chart).

Consumers Post Breach Actions

In response to another question, this one asking about the frequency at which they changed their passwords, more than half (58 percent) admitted that they changed their personal e-mail or online passwords only when forced or prompted to do so. Fewer than 10 percent changed it monthly.

When we compare the results of this study with other consumer attitudinal studies, it becomes clear that the ability to get consumers to actually adopt strong security practices remains a major challenge. At "Portals and Rails, we will continue to stress the importance of efforts to educate consumers, and we ask that you join us in this effort.

Photo of Deborah Shaw

June 23, 2014 in consumer fraud, consumer protection, data security, identity theft, privacy | Permalink

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Consumers have been hearing "the horror stories around the campfire" for so long, they have come to believe that if the "boogieman" is going to get you, there is nothing you can do about it. However, this is just not true. The FSO industry needs to promote consumer education efforts to update the public: we are each provided options every day that can serve to reduce our exposure to the fraud/ID theft boogieman - at FraudAvengers.org we call it "anti-fraud activism". Once aware, consumers will find themselves liberated to make choices based on their own risk tolerance about: how they make and receive payments; how they use their communication devices; the places in which they voluntarily place their personal information; ways and frequency of monitoring their financial, medical and other personal records; who and how they do business with people they have never met and/or do not know; etc. By ensuring we always include the "lessons learned" after we tell our horror stories, we serve to educate the public and inform them of protective actions they can take in their own defense. Crime collar criminals are always looking for victims: by reducing one's visibility to them and by proactively knowing what to watch-out for, consumers can greatly reduce the likelihood of becoming victims.

Posted by: Jodi Pratt | June 23, 2014 at 03:19 PM

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April 28, 2014


Is Personal Data Privacy Going, Going, Gone?

Since last December, it seems that not a week has gone by without a headline about another breach of consumers' payment or personal data. These articles—which are no longer limited to banking or IT industry publications—have created both weariness and concern among consumers. The market research firm GfK conducted a national survey of U.S. consumers in March 2014 to measure the impact of these breaches and better understand how consumers view and manage their personal data. They surveyed 1,000 individuals over the age of 18 and sorted the results by generation. Some of the findings I found most interesting were:

  • All generations are concerned about the protection of their personal data and, overall, 59 percent indicated that their concern has risen over the last 12 months.
    Question: Are you concerned about the protection of your personal data?
  • One-third of the survey participants indicated that they had been the victim of the misuse of their personal data at least once over the past year.
  • Over half (54 percent) of those surveyed don't believe the U.S. government is doing enough to protect their data, with two-thirds of the pre-boomers taking that position.
  • Overall, 80 percent of the respondents believe there should be additional regulations preventing organizations from reselling their personal data to third parties.
  • There is a strong demand from consumers for all consumer-facing industries to change their data privacy and personal data usage policies, but that demand is the highest for credit card companies and social networks.
  • Banks are in the top four trusted organizations regarding the protection of personal data but trailing health care organizations, online payment systems, and online retailers. Social networks, international businesses, and marketers and advertisers are the least trusted.
  • Although more than half of the participants do not agree with the tracking or recording of communication data without their permission, younger generations are not as concerned.
    Agreement with the statement: I accept that my communications data (e.g. phone, online) can be recorded without my approval to prevent crime.

So how are consumers behaving in light of this increased concern? Almost half (48 percent) indicated that they have changed their online practices and are avoiding the use of online auctions, online banking, and online social networks to reduce the likelihood that their personal data might be compromised or misused in some way. I have seen other research indicating that as much as 40 percent of a retailer's customers that have had their personal data compromised through a breach at that retailer will avoid that retailer, at least in the immediate term.

So what is the best approach to develop and maintain safeguards for consumer's personal information and transaction data? The private sector has always championed self-regulation through standards efforts such as PCI-DSS, but we all recognize that being compliant with a common minimum standard is not the same as being totally secure. There has been no shortage of recent congressional discussion on this issue, and future major breaches will likely add to the momentum such that it will be difficult to stop. Is that where you think we are headed—a regulatory fix coming from a legislative mandate? Let us hear from you.

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a retail payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

April 28, 2014 in consumer fraud, consumer protection, data security, regulations | Permalink

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The Target breach, in which 110 million Americans lost critical personal and financial data, is just the latest problem caused by extending legacy payment networks built in the 1960s to internet originated payments.

In the classic New Yorker cartoon, one dog says to the other, "On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog." Until we solve this problem, the legacy payment networks cannot be made secure. They were not architected with security built into them to do what we are doing today by extending them to payments generated from the internet. The security of any network is only as good as its weakest node. By moving access to the legacy payment systems to the internet, we added tens of millions of nodes to each legacy payment system and most of those nodes are not securely authenticated or truly secure.

A next generation payment system is required that is architected with security and encryption of all data "end to end", with no data ever “in the clear” and in which all users are "strongly authenticated". It is less expensive by orders of magnitude to build a new next generation payment system that can do that, than to retrofit one of the existing legacy payment systems, as I was once told by the former global CIO of VISA International. The existing legacy payment systems are all designed to have required information "in the clear" at multiple points in the transaction cycle.

The rapid rise of Bitcoin, despite its significant flaws, highlights the hunger in the marketplace for a better and more secure internet based global payment system. It would be better if that next generation payment system was also bank-centric and properly regulated, none of which Bitcoin is.

FYI, the New Yorker cartoon was first published in 1994, so this problem has been building for over 20 years.

Posted by: Stephen Lange Ranzini | April 28, 2014 at 05:31 PM

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March 10, 2014


Who Is Responsible for Consumer Security Education?

A theme that consistently appears in our Portals and Rails blogs is the continual need for consumer education when it comes to protecting account access credentials. Financial institutions have generally taken this responsibility seriously, running frequent verbal and print campaigns reminding customers to safeguard their payment cards, monitor account activity frequently, and adopt strong password and PIN access practices.

But as payment channels and access devices expand outside the bank-controlled environment, who then becomes responsible for customer education? The representatives of mobile phone carriers and handset manufacturers, for example, are often in sales mode. The last thing they want to do is scare off a potential sale by identifying the potential for fraud with their product or service.

When I recently went to purchase a new mobile phone that was equipped with a number of strong security safeguard options, the sales representative was more interested in selling me high-margin accessories than telling me how to safeguard the phone and its contents. While I understand the motivation of the sales representative, especially if he works under a sales incentive compensation plan, wouldn’t it easy for the carrier or phone manufacturer to provide a brochure promoting safe practices?

Unfortunately for the financial institutions, the stakes are high. For them, the financial impact of fraudulent activity on a customer's account is often a one-two punch. First, various regulations and rules are in place to protect consumers from liability, so the financial institutions generally write off the fraud loss. Second, and perhaps more painful, victims of fraud often move their accounts even though their financial institution is not at fault. The challenge of consumer education by the bankers is becoming more and more difficult as the opportunity for direct contact with the customer lessens with every new payment transaction product or service.

As we've seen before, in the aftermath of recent card transaction and customer data breaches, the negative reputational and financial impact from fraud is felt not just by financial institutions but also by the retailer or company that was breached. Will such events cause these other stakeholders to take a more proactive role and join financial institutions in educating their customers?

Portals and Rails is interested in hearing from you as to how the payments industry might best address customer awareness and education regarding security.

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a retail payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

March 10, 2014 in banks and banking, consumer fraud, consumer protection, data security, mobile payments | Permalink

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February 03, 2014


Call Center Phone Fraud: Are You Really Who You Say You Are?

"Have I reached the party to whom I am speaking?" Lily Tomlin would use this line whenever she would play her character Ernestine the telephone operator on the classic TV comedy show "Laugh-In." But to the thousands of financial institutions that operate call centers, the question of whether their customer service representatives are talking to an actual customer is no laughing matter.

In a recent report on call center phone fraud, Pindrop Security cites a number of alarming statistics based on their clients' actual experiences: one in every 2,500 calls to a call center is fraudulent; the average fraud loss per call received is $0.57; and the average potential loss to an account from phone fraud is more than $42,000. It seems that the call center has become an increasingly attractive target for fraudsters.

A call from someone not authorized to access the bank account in question may not directly result in a financial loss on that call. In fact, Pindrop's research indicates that it takes an average of five calls before the fraudster gathers enough information to strike. They use those preliminary calls to gain account or customer information that will help them subsequently to generate a fraudulent transaction, whether it's through the call center or another channel. Some of the calls are from criminals who are simply trying to get account information such as credit and debit card information that they can sell to others. Some of the calls attempts to change account settings such as statement mailing address or call-back phone numbers. With a simple address change, the criminal can gain more information about the accountholder and also keep the victim from being alerted to fraud on their account. Often, a call that results in a direct loss occurs when the fraudster obtains sufficient account credentials to generate a fraudulent wire transfer or ACH transfer from the targeted account.

While these criminals might be looked at as "low-tech hackers" compared to the sophisticated hackers who probe computer systems or worse, the evidence from law enforcement shows that these groups are just as well-organized and sophisticated. They are often based outside the United States, which makes investigations and prosecutions difficult. Sometimes they use technology to change their voice or to show a fake phone number on the bank's caller ID system. The fake phone number helps the fake caller avoid suspicion when the call is coming from outside the customer's area of residence.

To address this growing attack vector, financial institutions are adopting new technology to help them detect potentially fraudulent calls. Voice biometric technology can detect altered voices or even compare the caller's voice to a database to verify the caller's legitimacy. In addition, phone call and device "fingerprinting" gathers enough information from the caller's device to allows the call to be scored, just like a card transaction, on how likely it is to be fraudulent.

It is clear that criminals are attacking all physical and virtual channels of banks, sometimes using information obtained through one channel to carry out fraud in another channel. Portals and Rails believes it is important that you approach your fraud mitigation strategy from a cross-channel perspective. Please let us hear about your challenges and successes with such efforts.

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a retail payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

February 3, 2014 in authentication, banks and banking, consumer protection | Permalink

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January 21, 2014


Online Payday Lenders: An Illustration of the Importance of Bank Due Diligence

3-legged stool Because of a series of incidents involving illegal payday loans, online payday lenders have been featured in news articles of late. They've also been the focus of increasing enforcement actions to ensure that adequate consumer protection is in place. States are stepping up their enforcement actions against online payday lenders that violate state laws, and federal regulators are stepping up enforcement of federal and state laws. Meanwhile, online lenders and their third-party payment processors are defending their roles in providing this borrowing option to consumers.

The recent uptick in attention on online payday lenders is an impetus for us to stress the importance of banks conducting their due diligence process for any payment processor or business for which they provide payment services. It's useful to look at this due diligence as a three-legged stool, with regulatory compliance, know your customer (KYC), and know your customer's customer (KYCC) all working together to keep the stool upright.

In an August 2013 post, we examined the risks incurred by banks that originate payments for online payday lenders. Much debate has focused on whether online payday lenders—and those who provide services to them—are unfairly targeted by regulators and enforcement agencies. The reality is that businesses that comply with state and federal law are not the reason for increased guidance and enforcement.

When it comes to online payday lending, the law—one leg of the stool—is quite complex. At the state level, laws can significantly differ from state to state. Some states, including Georgia, do not even allow online payday lending. But many online payday lenders operate virtually, and are therefore more likely to operate nationally, which can add to the confusion about complying with all relevant state and federal laws. When conducting their due diligence processes, banks should always consider their customers' ability to operate within the law.

KYC and KYCC are also two very important components of a bank's due diligence process with any customer for which they originate transactions. The better the bank understands the business lines of its originator from the very beginning, and the better they understand it over time by way of continuous monitoring, the greater their chance to quickly identify and address any problems.

Like any business, online payday lenders can use the services of a third-party payment processor. As we explained in a September 2013 post, payment processors are a bank's direct customer in providing payment services to businesses . This adds another layer to the bank's due diligence processes. With this kind of relationship, banks now need to know their customer's customer—in this case, the online payday lender.

Banks should use the recent attention to online payday lenders as a reminder to review and improve their due diligence practices for all their customers. They should make sure that all three legs—KYC, KYCC, and compliance with the law—are in place so that the stool doesn't topple.

What lessons has your bank learned from the recent attention to payday lenders?

Photo of Deborah ShawBy Deborah Shaw, a retail payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

January 21, 2014 in banks and banking, consumer protection | Permalink

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January 13, 2014


Into the Breach: Protecting the Integrity of the Payment System

The breach of Target's point-of-sale system that compromised up to 40 million cardholders during the 2013 holiday shopping period has prompted us to step back and examine this attack—and wonder about its aftereffects. We've certainly seen the expected media attention for a crime of this magnitude, and the filing of class-action lawsuits wasn't far behind despite the lack of any verifiable fraud—as yet. We also have to wonder about its effect on consumers' confidence in the U.S. payment system.

For consumers to have confidence in the payment system, it is critical that they feel their financial information is protected during a payment transaction. And when that information has to be stored, they need to know that it is stored safely and securely. The research shows—and many consumers are well aware—that the creation of synthetic or stolen identities depends primarily on information obtained from data breaches.

All kinds of consumer advice followed the data breach. Many consumer advocates advised cardholders who had used their debit card at Target during the time their POS system was compromised to go to their financial institutions and request a card reissuance to prevent possible fraud. Others focused not on how consumers might recover from the Target breach but on how to prevent problems in the future—that is, they suggested that consumers use credit cards rather than debit cards because with credit cards, unauthorized transactions will not affect the payment of legitimate transactions. Some advocates suggested that people authenticate their debit cards at POS terminals with their signatures rather than their PINs, despite the fact that the level of PIN-based debit card fraud is almost one-third the level of signature-based debit card fraud.

Financial institutions also had varying responses. Some reissued cards when customers requested new cards, while others took a wait-and-see attitude. Still others lowered transaction limits on their customers' debit cards to minimize fraud exposure.

Of course, the Target incident has heated up the magnetic-stripe-versus-EMV conversation. As we've posted many times, the magnetic stripe was never intended to be a secure medium; the sophisticated and highly automated authorization systems were intended to carry the load of fraud detection capabilities. Some in the U.S. payment industry are calling for an acceleration of the migration to chip cards, currently scheduled for October 2015. They argue that EMV/chip cards will virtually eliminate the ability to create counterfeit cards. Some are even requesting that the government or the card networks mandate the technology, which many other countries did in their transitions to EMV. However, the reality is, we will have to keep our magnetic-stripe cards a minimum of five to 10 years, until the vast majority of merchant locations are equipped with EMV-capable terminals. And we should keep in mind that EMV is not a solution by itself—it cannot address card-not-present fraud.

As the authorities complete the forensics of the recent data breach, the industry will develop and implement additional security controls and measures. This added security will then prompt the criminals to look for other weak points. And look they will. So has this major incident shaken consumers' confidence? It is too early to know. What is clear is that the payments industry must come together to develop a cohesive strategy, and they should do so before consumer confidence in the payments system is further compromised.

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a retail payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

January 13, 2014 in consumer fraud, consumer protection, debit cards, EMV | Permalink

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As the number of consumers affected by the Target breach has risen to 110 million and news of the Neiman Marcus and Michaels breaches surface, much discussion about improving card security has been sparked—including the adoption of EMV technology. While EMV is not the perfect solution, it is only a matter of time before the costs of fraud in the U.S. begin to outweigh the cost of implementing EMV cards or another innovative technology that works within our existing infrastructure. The tipping point may be here for banks to take a step in a new direction to better address card security in the U.S.

Posted by: Karen Gordon | January 28, 2014 at 04:56 PM

Why is the U.S. so behind Europe and Asia in adopting EMV in place of magentic stripe?

Do you think accelerating the migration to chip cards will happen?

Posted by: Saba H | January 21, 2014 at 09:21 AM

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