Take On Payments

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Take On Payments, a blog sponsored by the Retail Payments Risk Forum of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, is intended to foster dialogue on emerging risks in retail payment systems and enhance collaborative efforts to improve risk detection and mitigation. We encourage your active participation in Take on Payments and look forward to collaborating with you.

March 16, 2015


Squeezing the Fraud Balloon

A number of our posts over the last year have discussed the U.S. migration to EMV (chip) cards. As we've mentioned, one of the primary motivations for the migration has been the ease with which fraudsters in our magnetic-stripe environment can create counterfeit payment cards. Other posts have mentioned that ubiquitous tenant of the criminal world—the person always on the lookout for the weakest link or the easiest target. And that criminal does not close up shop and go away in the chip-card world. There is clear evidence from other countries that criminals, after an EMV migration, look for, and find, other targets of opportunity—just as when you squeeze a balloon, you're constricting the middle, but both ends simultaneously expand.

One major area that criminals target post-EMV is online commerce, an activity referred to as card-not-present (CNP) fraud. However, criminals also target two other areas, according to speakers at the recent 2015 BAI Payments Connect conference: checks and account applications. Well before the EMV card liability shift occurs in the United States (October 1, 2015), a number of financial institutions have reported a marked increase in counterfeit checks and duplicate-item fraud, usually by way of the mobile deposit capture service. In many cases, the fraud takes place on accounts that have been open for more than six months, long enough to allow the criminal to have established an apparent pattern of "normalcy," although there are reports of newly opened accounts being used as well.

Canadian financial institutions report that fraudulent applications for credit and checking accounts have increased as much as 300 percent since that country's EMV liability shift. Criminals are opening checking accounts to perpetrate overall identity theft fraud as well as to create conduits for future counterfeit check or kiting fraud. And they're submitting fraudulent credit applications to purchase automobiles or other merchandise that they can then sell easily.

The time to examine and improve your fraud detection capabilities across all the channels customers use is now. Financial institutions should already be evaluating their check acceptance processes and account activity parameters to spot problem accounts early. Likewise, financial institutions should make sure their KYC, or know-your-customer, processes and tools are adequate to handle the additional threat that the credit and account application channel may experience. Be proactive to prevent the fraud in the first place while ensuring you have the proper detection capabilities to react quickly to potential fraudulent attempts. If we want to constrict the balloon of fraud, we're going to have to constrict the whole thing with consistent, equal pressure.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


March 16, 2015 in chip-and-pin, EMV, KYC | Permalink

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March 02, 2015


Security at the ATM: We Have Some Educating to Do

ATM Marketplace recently published its 2015 triennial research report, which includes results of a poll of U.S. consumers on various issues related to ATMs. The online poll was conducted with a panel of 550+ individuals creating a representative sample of the adult (aged 18–65 years) population. Certain findings from the report stand out, in particular those related to consumers' expectations of various aspects of ATM transaction risk.

One question probed how concerned the respondent was about a skimming or camera device capturing their card information and PIN when they use the ATM. Thirty-eight percent indicated they were very concerned, but the remaining 61 percent indicated they were not that concerned or weren't even aware of what a skimming device is. The pie chart below breaks down each response.

01

Does the lack of concern come from a lack of education, or is it because the respondent knows the financial institution will have to bear the financial liability?

One of the final questions in the poll was whether the respondent felt an EMV card would make an ATM transaction more secure. As the chart below shows, more than half of the respondents believed there would be at least some level of improved security.

02

Of great concern to me is the 15 percent who indicated they don't know what an EMV card is. Of the two groups who mostly reported this lack of knowledge, one was the youngest (18–24) group, which surprised me. These younger people are supposed to be more tech-savvy than the rest of us. But of even greater surprise was that almost one-third (31 percent) of the most affluent group (those with a household income more than $150,000) responded they don't know what an EMV card is.

Clearly, the financial industry has a lot of educating to do as credit and debit card issuers ramp up their EMV card issuance in advance of the point-of-sale liability shift on October 1, 2015. While the ATM liability shift for domestic MasterCards won't be until October 2016 and Visa cards, a year later, it's never too early to begin or continue educational initiatives.

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

March 2, 2015 in ATM fraud, chip-and-pin, EMV | Permalink

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February 23, 2015


Payments Stakeholders: Can't We All Just Work Together?

Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.
 – Henry Ford

In my physics classes at Georgia Tech, I found the principles around forces, momentum, and energy sometimes difficult to comprehend and distinguish. But I readily grasped a simplified version. I understood that if people apply their combined energy in the same direction, they can move the object of their attention to a designated spot faster and easier than if any of them tried it alone. And if they directly oppose one another or exert their efforts in different directions, the movement of the object is slow, its route is haphazard, and it may never reach its intended destination.

This last situation sometimes occurs with different groups of payments stakeholders—most notably, but not exclusively—the national card brands, along with their financial institution clients, and the merchant communities. Amidst all the charges and countercharges between the groups, it sometimes appears that these stakeholders are pushing in different directions—so the industry seems to be making little progress toward adopting payments standards and practices or fraud prevention solutions, for example.

An important payments risk issue affecting multiple stakeholders is card-not-present (CNP) fraud, which is expected to increase significantly after the United States migrates to EMV chip cards. We learned this from the experiences of other countries that have completed their migration. What happens is that EMV cards essentially close the door on the criminals' ability to create counterfeit EMV cards, so they shift focus to CNP opportunities.

Merchants contend that EMV card migration primarily benefits the card issuers since, for counterfeit-card-present (CCP) fraud, the issuer normally takes the loss—and EMV makes CCP fraud much less likely. Another way merchants may view EMV as being more issuer-friendly is that they must bear card-present fraud loss if they don't upgrade their terminals—at their expense—once the October 2015 liability shift goes into effect. So not only do they face increasing liability for card-present transactions, they will continue to be held responsible for the expected increase in CNP fraud losses.

The card brands and financial institutions counter the merchants' position on a number of fronts. For example, they point to the massive payment card data breaches that took place in 2014 at national merchants, saying these events eroded consumers' confidence in payment cards. Migrating to EMV cards and eventually replacing the magnetic stripe will provide clear improvements to payment card security, which will in turn increase consumer confidence in the safety of using cards. And that will benefit all stakeholders in this payment system. In addition, card brands and financial institutions are taking steps to help mitigate CNP fraud: they have invested heavily in several products and are collaborating with third-party providers to develop better customer authentication solutions to ultimately reduce the risk of CNP transactions for all stakeholders.

Disagreements among stakeholders will always exist, especially on elements that have a major financial impact on their businesses. However, there must be a diligent and ongoing effort by all parties, working together and with the same goal, to find areas of common ground that will result in a more secure payments environment.

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


February 23, 2015 in cards, chip-and-pin, EMV, payments | Permalink

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February 02, 2015


Does More Security Mean More Friction in Payments?

In a 2014 post, we discussed the issue of consumers' security practices in light of the regulatory liability protection provided to consumers, especially related to electronic transactions. Recognizing that poor security practices will continue, financial institutions, merchants, and solution vendors continue to implement additional security and fraud deterrence tools in the payment flow. Sometimes those tools can add complexity to a financial transaction.

One of the critical elements in a consumer's experience when performing a financial transaction is the concept of friction. In the payments environment, friction can be measured by the number and degree of barriers that impede a smooth and successful transaction flow. Potential causes of friction in a payment transaction include lack of acceptance, slow speed, inaccuracy, high cost, numerous steps, and lack of reliability. We usually think that to decrease friction is to increase convenience.

As the level of friction increases, consumers become more likely to rethink their purchase and payment decisions—an action that merchants and financial institutions alike dread because an abandoned payment transaction represents lost revenue. Individual consumers have their preferred payment methods, and their perspective of the convenience associated with a particular method is a key factor in their choice. For this reason, the payment industry stakeholders have been working diligently to reduce the level of friction in the various forms of payments. Technology provides a number of advantages, potentially reducing the overall friction of payments by providing consumers with a variety of payment form factors. For example, smartphones can support integrated payment applications allowing the consumer to easily call up their payment credentials and execute a payment transaction at a merchant's terminal. With abandonment rates as high as 68 percent, online merchants, working diligently to reduce friction, are streamlining their checkout process by reducing the number of screens to navigate.

Clearly cognizant of the friction issue, the industry has focused much of its efforts on operating fraud risk tools in the background, so that customers remain unaware of them. Other tools are more overt—biometrics on mobile phones, hardware tokens for PCs, and transaction alerts. But some security improvements the industry has undertaken have resulted in more friction, including the EMV card. A consumer must now leave the EMV card in the terminal for the duration of the transaction when previously all the consumer had to do was simply swipe the card. It will be interesting to see if and how consumers adjust their payment habits should they view the EMV card technology as high in friction. Will this motivate consumers to move away from card-based payments? Time will tell, and we will closely follow this issue.

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed


February 2, 2015 in biometrics, chip-and-pin, EMV, innovation, payments | Permalink

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David,
You've touched upon an important continuing battle. The balancing act of maximizing conversion vs. maximizing security/fraud prevention can be a real conundrum. It impacts revenue and can even divide offices. It comes down to what your product/service is, what your appetite for risk is, and what tools you have in place. It is important though for financial institutions and ecommerce companies to seek out new technology solutions to maximize security and not be stagnant with the status quo.

Posted by: Logan | February 03, 2015 at 07:46 PM

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December 22, 2014


Top 10 Payments Events in 2014

As the year draws to a close, the Portals and Rails team would like to share its own "Top 10" list of major payments-related events and issues that took place in the United States this year.

#10: Proposed prepaid rule. After a long wait, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued its proposed rules on general reloadable prepaid cards in November. While the major players in the prepaid card industry had already adopted most of the practices included in the proposed rule, the proposal allowing overdrafts and credit extensions is likely to generate differing perspectives during the comment period before a final rule is adopted in 2015.

#9: Regulation II. The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia upheld the Federal Reserve Bank's rules regarding interchange fees and network routing rules, reversing a 2013 decision. Notice of appeal on the interchange fee portion of the ruling has been given, but resolution of the network routing rules has cleared the way for the development of applications supporting routing on chip cards.

#8: Payment trends. The detailed Federal Reserve Bank's triennial payments study results were released in July 2014, continuing the Fed's 15-year history of conducting this comprehensive payments research. Cash usage continued to decline but remained the most-used form of payment in terms of transaction volume.

#7: Card-not-present (CNP) fraud. With the growing issuance of chip cards and the experience of other countries post-EMV migration—with substantial amounts of fraud moving to the online commerce environment—the payments industry continues to search for improved security solutions for CNP fraud that minimize customer friction and abandonment.

#6: Faster payments. Continuing a process it began in the fall of 2013 at the release of a consultative white paper, the Federal Reserve Bank held town halls and stakeholder meetings throughout the year in preparation of the release of its proposed roadmap towards improving the payment system.

#5: Virtual currencies. Every conference we attended had sessions or tracks focused on virtual currencies like Bitcoin. While there was some advancement in the acceptance of Bitcoin by major retailers, the number of consumers using the currency did not rise significantly.

#4: Mobile payments. The entry of Apple with its powerful brand identity into the mobile payments arena with Apple Pay has energized the mobile payments industry and brought improved payment security through tokenization and biometrics closer to the mainstream. (Apple Pay's impact on mobile payment transaction volume will likely be negligible for a couple of years.) Additionally, the use of host card emulation, or HCE, as an alternative contactless communications technology provides another option for mobile wallet development.

#3: EMV migration. The frequency and magnitude of the data breaches this year have spurred financial institutions and merchants alike into speeding up their support of EMV chip cards in advance of the October 2015 liability shift.

#2: Third-party processors. Regulators and law enforcement escalated the attention they were giving to the relationships of financial institutions with third-party processors because of increased concerns about deceitful business practices as well as money laundering.

And…drum roll, please!

#1: Data breaches. The waves of data breaches that started in late 2013 continued to grow throughout 2014 as more and more retailers revealed that their transaction and customer data had been compromised. The size and frequency of the data breaches provided renewed impetus to improve the security of our payments system through chip card migration and the implementation of tokenization.

How does this list compare to your Top 10?

All of us at the Retail Payments Risk Forum wish our Portals and Rails readers Happy Holidays and a prosperous and fraud-free 2015!

Photo of Mary Kepler Photo of Doug King Photo of David Lott Photo of Julius Weyman



Mary Kepler, vice president; Doug King, payments risk specialist; Dave Lott, payments risk expert; and Julius Weyman, vice president—all of the Atlanta Fed's Retail Payments Risk Forum.


December 22, 2014 in chip-and-pin, cybercrime, data security, EMV, innovation, mobile payments, prepaid, regulations, third-party service provider | Permalink

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September 15, 2014


Let’s Talk Token: Authenticating Payments

It's challenging to have a conversation about EMV cards—cards with chip technology—given their well-documented fraud-mitigating shortcomings, without diving into a conversation on tokenization. And these conversations just intensified with Apple announcing the use of tokenization with its soon-to-be launched mobile payment application. Tokenization of payment card data can provide an additional layer of security to EMV cards for in-person payments and mitigates fraud risks that these cards don't address in the non-face-to-face environment.

I recently spoke at a forum on EMV cards, where it became evident to me that there is a high degree of confusion in the payments industry, especially within the merchant community, about tokenization. Currently, multiple standards initiatives around a new tokenization framework are under way, so Portals and Rails is embarking on a series of posts on tokenization. In this first installment, we define tokenization and distinguish between tokens generated within the merchant's environment (an enterprise solution) and payment tokens generated as an end-to-end-solution. A future post will compare the various payment end-to-end tokenization initiatives that have been announced to date.

In the data security and payments environment, tokenization is the substitution of sensitive data with a surrogate value representing the original data but having no monetary value. For payment cards, tokenization refers to the substitution of part or all of a card’s PAN, or primary account number, with a totally randomized value, or token. A true token cannot be mathematically reversed to determine the original PAN, but a token service provider in a highly secure environment can subsequently link it to its associated PAN.

Tokenization of payment credentials has been around since the mid-2000s, driven primarily by the issuance in 2004 of the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS), which defines merchant requirements for protecting cardholder data. Merchants historically stored PANs for a variety of reasons, including to use in settlement reconciliation, perform incremental authorizations, handle chargebacks, and identify cardholder transactions for loyalty programs. With tokenization, merchants can remove PANs from their data environment and replace them with tokens—and thereby reduce their PCI-DSS compliance requirements. However, this enterprise solution still requires that the PAN enter the merchant environment before the tokenization process taking place.

Under the tokenization initiatives currently under way from the Clearing House and EMVCo, a financial institution would issue a token replacing a cardholder's PAN to the person's mobile handset, tablet, or computer device before initiating a digital payment transaction. So the merchant, rather than receiving the cardholder's PAN for initiating a transaction, would receive a token value associated with that PAN, which would then be de-tokenized outside the merchant's environment to obtain the necessary authorization and complete the transaction. The merchant never has knowledge of the cardholder's PAN—and that is a significant difference between these tokenization initiatives and the enterprise solution related to handling payment credentials.

The Clearing House's and EMVCo's concepts for payment tokenization are similar in many ways, but they also have differences. A future post will delve into the end-to-end tokenization initiatives and consider the impact on mitigating risk in payment transactions.

Photo of Douglas A. KingBy Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

September 15, 2014 in cards, chip-and-pin, EMV | Permalink

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February 18, 2014


The Mythical End State of Security

As a proponent of secure payments, I am happy to see the EMV (chip card technology) discussion take center stage with national media outlets and on the Hill after the recent revelation of data breaches involving payment card data at merchants. Having written and spoken extensively on the benefits (as well as the shortcomings) of migrating to the EMV standard here in the United States, I am a strong believer in EMV's ability to reduce counterfeit card-present fraud. But I do feel that a bigger story is getting lost in these EMV discussions—that of payment card data security.

Security approaches are not static, but must be constantly improving and evolving, thanks in large part to a rapidly changing technology environment and evolving tactics of criminals. A solution that is implemented today will more than likely become obsolete or in need of additional investment to remain viable in the future. There is no "end state" when it comes to security. A wait-and-see approach for this hypothetical end state is flawed.

Consider my home security system to which I recently added video monitoring capabilities. This addition to my system made my upgrade to glass-breaking sensors several years ago seem like a bad investment. But had I waited for the camera technology, perhaps I would have suffered the same fate of several of my neighbors who ended up with bad guys breaking windows to gain entrance into an empty house. And though I feel better protected now than I was several years ago, I realize that it is inevitable that another upgrade with additional costs will be necessary in due time to best protect my property and family.

EMV is a solution ready to have a positive and immediate impact on reducing the value of stolen card data. And because of that, I am an advocate for its adoption in the United States according to the adoption plans set by the card networks. However, EMV alone does not provide complete protection of card data, and stolen card data retains value to fraudsters even in an EMV world. Magnetic stripes will not disappear overnight with a migration to EMV. (The UK began their migration in earnest seven years ago and mag stripes are still commonly found on their cards.) And stolen card data can easily be used in the card-not-present environment.

The payment industry must strive to secure payments data so that data stolen from breaches cannot be exploited for monetary value by criminals. Until the industry does that, it is reasonable to believe that data breaches and the subsequent effort to monetize the information will continue. EMV is a step in the right direction, but it is not the final and only step. EMV will be costly to implement. It will not and cannot be the final investment spent on securing card payments.

Douglas A. KingBy Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

February 18, 2014 in chip-and-pin, EMV, innovation | Permalink

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The largest drawback to EMV is the cost; I recently read that it would cost over eight billion dollars to change the current U.S. payment infrastructure to an EMV system. In your example, the camera system was a home security option that wasn’t feasible several years ago because of price and technology issues. Could it be possible that something like PayPal’s new payment method is a more logical step to address card security for the time being? PayPal’s payment code system is able to work with retailers existing barcode scanners and pin pads and provides more security to POS transactions than a mag-strip. This would allow for increased card security, at a reasonable cost, while the industry decides what the next best option is.

Posted by: Karen Gordon | March 17, 2014 at 12:42 PM

Douglas,

Like you, I'm glad to see that the key participants and contributors to the US payment system are recognizing the need for improvement in card data security and considering how EMV might help. I also support your contention that EMV is neither a comprehensive nor final solution. Why isn't the Fed taking a proactive role to research solutions that would eliminate the capture and transfer of card data and thus remove the risks from the points of sale altogether? There are already some interesting products in the marketplace that enable this approach and it seems a better investment for the short and long term.

Posted by: Gary Yamamura | February 18, 2014 at 10:10 PM

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February 10, 2014


Chip-and-PIN, or Chip-and-Choice?

If the comments that legislators and industry representatives made at the recent congressional hearings on data breaches were any indication, any card issuer advocating or adopting a chip-and-signature approach to EMV smartcard implementation would appear to be incautious. Unquestionably, chip-and-PIN is more secure than chip-and-signature because it represents two forms of authentication—something you have (the card) and something you know (the PIN). However, chip-and-signature could be a reasonable first step in that it would generate less friction for the consumer, merchant, and card issuer. Let me explain why.

Most consumers don't know their credit card PINs
Although most people know their debit card PINs—you need one to use an ATM—few U.S. consumers know their credit card PINs. Various studies place consumers' knowledge of their credit card PINs in the 5 to 10 percent range. It would therefore be an educational as well as logistical effort to get consumers to begin using their credit card PINs if the industry moved to a chip-and-PIN-only environment.

Merchants would incur a big expense for the equipment
Only about 25 percent of the 8 million POS terminals operating in the United States are equipped with a PIN pad, according to data provided to the Federal Reserve. Before Regulation II, merchants had a financial incentive to encourage PIN-based debit transactions because the interchange rate was lower than for credit card transactions. However, Reg II eliminated this differential. (This despite the fact that PIN debit transactions have less than one-third of the fraud loss rate of signature debit transactions, according to the 2013 Fed Payments Study Summary.) Although a representative of the National Retail Federation endorsed a chip-and-PIN-only strategy at a congressional hearing, it's difficult to know if merchants will want to make the additional investment required to equip, program, and maintain their POS systems to support PIN transactions. Most merchants have not yet taken this step, so what has changed?

Customer experience would change
A PIN-based transaction, with its single-message authorization and settlement process, creates problems for certain merchants—like car rental and lodging companies—that must run preauthorization transactions before the final amount of the transaction is determined. The separate authorization and settlement process provided by the dual-message format of a signature-based transaction is more conducive to the business needs of these merchant segments. Are fine dining restaurants going to install the even more expensive mobile payment terminals so customers can pay at the table as they currently do? Or will they require the customer to go to a checkout and pay there? These merchants especially will have to consider the impact on their customer experience.

Backup method needed
With debit cards now, a signature authentication can be a backup method of acceptance. But in a chip-and-PIN environment, how high will the rate of incomplete transactions be when cardholders can't remember their PINs and they have no other method of payment?

As with any change, there are a number of positives and negatives to be considered. To avoid unintended consequences, we at Portals and Rails believe that issuers, merchants, and consumer groups should carefully evaluate all the issues to determine the best way to migrate to EMV payment cards. What do you think—chip-and-PIN only or chip-and-choice?

Photo of David LottBy David Lott, a retail payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

February 10, 2014 in chip-and-pin, data security, debit cards, EMV | Permalink

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All issuers should support a well communicated and simple PIN change process (IVR, ATM or inbranch for example) for EMV cards. If cards are activated through an IVR; PIN selection could be added to the process. Cards can also be issued with unassigned PINs (the PIN is not sent to the cardholder) where the cardholder is forced to select a PIN; this process may encourage cardholders to proactively select a PIN they can remember. Re-issued cards can support PIN continuity (same PIN as previous card).

Support for PIN as the only permitted CVM will be more successful if ALL the card associations follow this practice. If one or more of them allow for signature CVM then cardholders may select the signature card and not bother to learn/select a PIN for the PINned card. This in turn leads to an uneven playing field and all chip cards may eventually revert to signature cards which would certainly be a step backwards.

As long as fallback to magstripe is supported, any cardholder that forgets their PIN can usually have the terminal revert to mag stripe (at least in Canada) by inserting the card backwards (you may have to do this three times). The terminal will attempt to read the chip (but can't because there is plastic where a chip should be) then ask for a mag stripe read while ignoring the service code (chip on board) info.

Posted by: M Ryan | February 11, 2014 at 12:49 PM

Your points are all valid, but I'd like to comment.

You are correct that most consumers don't know their credit card PINs and this would be a learning experience. Some POS application developers are putting in "PIN Bypass" functionality for this reason, although I believe that defeats the purpose of allowing the issuer to prefer PIN.

Merchants will incure some expense for migrating to EMV, but most EMV Card Readers are built into PIN pads, so with or without PIN, the expense is the same.

PIN based Credit transactions will continue to be dual message. PIN Debit transaction sre single message because they are "full financial" transactions that don't require a separate message.

EMV works perfectly fine with Hotels in the rest of the world, with incremental transactions after the original with PIN.

Yes, in Canada and Europe it is common for the customer to pay at the table with a wireless terminal. This supports the philosophy of "not handing your card to a stranger" that was promoted in those countries to support the implementation of EMV.

Yes, there will be a period of adjustment, perhaps painful - but not really much different than when PIN Debit at the POS was first introduced, just a larger scale.

Unfortunately, the more secure a process is, the less convenient it is. The U.S. has chosen convenience in the past, and we are seeing the repercussions of that approach.

Posted by: Allen Friedman | February 10, 2014 at 02:13 PM

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October 07, 2013


Fraud Happens. So What Do You Do?

As both a data junkie and someone interested in payments fraud, I must admit that I am envious of my colleagues across the pond in the United Kingdom. The Financial Fraud Action UK recently released Fraud the Facts 2013, its annual report providing insight and data on payments fraud in the U.K. financial services industry. Unfortunately, no such report exists in the United States.

This year's report drives home two key points that were discussed at our July 31 Improving Customer Authentication forum. First, the enrollment process is a critical initial step in securing transactions. Enrolling a fraudster can only result in fraudulent transactions. Second, consumer education remains an important aspect of mitigating fraud—a topic we at the Risk Forum have written and spoken on extensively. Despite the fact that the United Kingdom uses the EMV standard—which is based on chip card technology—overall payment card fraud increased by 14 percent from 2011 to 2012. Among its many insights, the report reinforces the idea that EMV adoption alone will not keep fraud from occurring.

Aside from the usual suspects of card-not-present (CNP) fraud and cross-border fraud in non-EMV countries, the report mentions two other contributors to payment card fraud growth that captured my attention. One, card ID theft fraud, which includes application fraud (using stolen or fake documents to open an account) and account takeover fraud (using another person’s credit or debit card account by posing as the genuine cardholder), increased by 42 percent from 2011 to 2012. Two, criminals have resorted to using "low-tech deception crimes" to convince consumers to part with their cards, PINs, and passwords.

The important takeaway I got from this report is that no matter the technology or standard used on payment cards, it remains critical to keep personally identifiable information protected and to continue to educate consumers about sound payment practices. The industry could use the most sophisticated and secure solutions to authorize and authenticate transactions, but those sophisticated, secure solutions can do very little to prevent the use of accounts established fraudulently.

Criminals are exploiting weaknesses in both the enrollment process and consumer behavior. These weaknesses are not something a chip-embedded card can solve.

So what tools can and should the industry use to prevent a criminal from using a stolen or synthetic identity to open an account? Do you think information available through social media could play a role in this process? We would value your thoughts.

Douglas A. KingBy Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

October 7, 2013 in authentication, cards, chip-and-pin, EMV, identity theft | Permalink

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While everyone is focused on the water main, there are millions of slow, steady fraud drips that aren't getting any attention: call center transactions.

Just started a subscription yesterday and read my CC# to some faceless agent in some unknown call center. Did she write it down? The call was recorded. Are the quality monitoring people writing it down and selling it?

There are solutions readily available. They are simple. They are cheap. They work. But there is no hue and cry to use them...from consumers, from banks, from regulators, or from businesses.

Until known solutions to known and supposedly big problems are implemented, the hand wringing about fraud is beginning to look like a Potemkin Village...a veneer of concern with nothing behind it.

Posted by: Dennis Adsit | October 21, 2013 at 12:12 PM

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February 11, 2013


Is Growing Fraud Really a Catalyst for EMV?

My payments news feed has been filled with a heavy dose of EMV-related news these last few days. Take the January 2013 article from the American Banker that looks at the incidence of increasing fraud losses as the United States continues to lag on the implementation of EMV chip cards. This one especially caught my attention given that I had written a paper on this topic early in 2012.

In recent SEC filings, both Discover Financial Services and Capital One reported significant increases in fraud losses. Based on calculations using figures from Discover's latest annual report, its fraud rate on sales volume increased from 4.8 basis points in 2010 to 7.2 basis points in 2011, and reached 8.8 basis points in 2012. Because of our nation's continued reliance on magnetic-stripe cards, "we are the weakest link around the world," according to one analyst. According to another, "the fraud comes here." Given this trend of rising fraud losses, is fraud finally becoming a bigger part of the business case for EMV with card networks' liability shifts for counterfeit fraudulent transactions a little more than two years out?

I don't think that it is. While the American Banker article, and even my paper, paints a somewhat discouraging picture of the fraud situation, the fact remains that fraud is but a small, albeit growing, expense on an issuers' income statement. For example, Discover reported $93 million in fraud losses for 2012, or roughly $8 million more than it spent on postage. By comparison, net charge-offs from credit card debt cost them over $1.2 billion in 2012 and as much as $3.7 billion in 2010. Fraud risk as measured by fraud losses is just "another expense" to issuers while credit risk, measured by credit losses, has one of the largest, if not the largest, negative impact on an issuers' bottom line. Is it possible that fraud losses will have a larger negative impact further down the road? Absolutely, and I think they will. I also recognize there are other "soft costs" associated with card fraud in terms of cardholder inconvenience and overall payment safety perception.

Further, EMV does not address the entire fraud loss problem. It's no secret by now that while EMV has been excellent at reducing face-to-face fraud, card-not-present (CNP) fraud continues to rise because EMV does not effectively prevent it in today's online environment. For example, since the rollout of chip-and-PIN in 2008 in Canada, CNP fraud increased from C$128 million to C$259.5 million in 2011. This is another example of fraud moving to the weakest link in the payments chain. Ultimately, EMV as it exists today only solves part of the fraud equation. Until a cost-effective and consumer-friendly CNP fraud reduction solution gains traction, I believe a business case for EMV built around fraud losses will remain difficult to build. For some, the costs to implement EMV may be viewed as an insurance policy against a widespread compromise of the mag-stripe technology.

It has been more than 17 months since Visa announced its EMV U.S. migration plan and a year since MasterCard announced its EMV "Roadmap." Still, issuance and acceptance of EMV cards remains tepid, if that, here in the United States. With a little over two years until the first liability shifts for the U.S. are scheduled to take place in April 2015, issuers will need to make EMV migration decisions soon if they intend to take advantage. But is the business case there currently?

Douglas A. KingBy Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

February 11, 2013 in card networks, cards, chip-and-pin, EMV | Permalink

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Comments

My view on EMV is that it is a fundamentally more secure payment vehicle than typical magnetic stripe cards - plain and simple.

There are many benefits outside of just fraud savings. Consider missed transactions that international travelers might incur with a traditional card. Aite analysis reveals that card issuers missed out on $4 billion in charge volume in 2008 because of problems cardholders had with their cards while traveling abroad.

Then there is consumer perception. Ask a consumer today if he/she would like to own a car without air bags? The answer is likely no. The same is likely to hold true for EMV cards. If I have two options, traditional or EMV, I'm likely to choose EMV because it's safer. We all need to protect and enhance the consumer experience.

One cannot accurately predict future fraud costs with any degree of certainty. The pie for fraudsters is getting smaller, and if I'm a bank or credit union I don't want to be in the cross-hairs, especially if those vulnerable are getting smaller. CNP fraud is escalating. The payments industry will need to solve for that.

Chris Slane, VP, Business Development, Quatrro Processing Services

Posted by: Chris Slane | February 28, 2013 at 07:41 AM

Excellent article. One that takes the credit card fraud issue head-on and establishes that issuers and merchants have more serious issues to worry about than controlling fraud. I also found @MikeB's comment - especially the part about "issue that matters most for consumers and that is False Positives and the need for their cards to always work, particularly for when they need them most" - very sensible.

Posted by: Ketharaman Swaminathan | February 17, 2013 at 12:41 PM

I think you need to add other costs in (eg, PCI-DSS compliance and fraudulent portion of charge-offs) to obtain the correct cost/benefit calculation.

Posted by: Dave Birch | February 15, 2013 at 02:26 AM

Douglas,
Very interesting article and I agree that it appears that the EMV benefit is perhaps not worth the industry expense particularly if you're also shifting fraud from CP to CNP. In addition, it seems that here in the US, we're poised to move to new payment technologies such as Digital Wallets, NFC and/or Bar-codes that are more inline with the American customer, who I'm sure won't want to slow down at the point of sale to put in a PIN number on a Credit card transaction.

We conducted trials in the UK last year that I believe get to the issue that matters most for consumers and that is False Positives and the need for their cards to always work, particularly for when they need them most. By using Location-Based Analytic, we saw a 55% reduction of false positives while at the same time seeing a 30% increase in fraud detection . All of this in a non-intrusive manner, allowing the consumer the convenience of just swiping their card and moving on.
Mike

Posted by: Mike Buhrmann, CEO Finsphere | February 12, 2013 at 02:11 PM

Fraud may continue to be manageable from a cost perspective, but it is ultimately damaging to the user experience and the network brand experience. Consumers are increasingly frustrated by dealing with fraudulent charges (even with zero liability), receiving notices that their accounts are being breached, receiving re-issued cards, and having to re-configure their automatic payments. The networks are the ones pushing EMV because ultimately it's confidence in their systems that is taking the hit.

Posted by: Aaron Press | February 11, 2013 at 04:26 PM

Your comments raise an interesting question, namely, how much of what banks allocate as net charge-offs are actually fraud losses - especially in cases of account takeover fraud. The bad guy gains access to an account, changes the address, runs up a huge balance and bolts. As these balances get stale, the bank can either categorize them as fraud or simply charge them off.

Posted by: Chip Wickenden | February 11, 2013 at 10:23 AM

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